Friday, November 30, 2012

Fun Facts about Gemstone Chains

With the new gemstone chains that arrived, it got me thinking about the meanings behind some of the gemstones and crystals in the chain and how by wearing assorted chains at the same time, I could tap in to different metaphysical healing theories.

Here are some fun facts and beliefs about some of the gemstones in the chains.

Aqua Chalcedony
Chalcedony is derived from the name of an ancient Greek town in Asia Minor known as Chalkedon.
With the exception of sticks, bones, rocks, and animal skins, Chalcedony is believed to one of the very first raw materials used by mankind, with the earliest recorded uses of Chalcedony being for weapons, tools, knives, bowls and cups.
Chalcedony rings that were worn by ancient Romans are still found in remarkably good shape today.
Chalcedony was used as a sacred stone by Native Americans, who believed that it would promote stability within the ceremonial rituals of the tribe.
Chalcedony is believed to increase endurance, stamina, vitality, and to promote emotional balance, kindness, charity, and friendliness. Physically, Chalcedony is said to relieve melancholy, fever, irritability, gall stones, and eye problems.
http://www.beadfx.com/images/s34716.jpg


Tourmaline
The name Tourmaline is widely accepted as being derived from the Singhalese expression tura mali, which when translated means “stone of many or mixed colors”.
Tourmaline is often referred to as the rainbow gemstone, due to the huge amout of colors that it is available in. This was certainly believed by the ancient Egyptians who believed that when Tourmaline traveled from its home in the earth's core to the surface, it did so along a rainbow, which subsequently gifted the gemstone with all of the colors of the rainbow.
Tourmalines exhibit piezoelectricity and when these stones become warm they become electrically charged – positively at one end and negatively at the other, acting like a magnet and strong enough to attract small particles of dust or ash. It is for this reason that the Dutch of old used Tourmalines to clean their pipes!
As with most gemstones, ancient civilizations credited Tourmaline gems with magical and mystical powers, including having the power to guard against danger and misfortune. Tourmalines are said to have an especially strong influence over friendship and love, lending permanance and stability to both. Tourmaline gems help to amplify psychic ability / energy and are an excellent aid to increasing self-confidence and understanding. Tourmaline is believed to help assist with tranquil sleep, calm nerves, improve concentration and creative processes and to be an aid to curing cancer. 
http://www.beadfx.com/images/s34708.jpg

Labradorite
A stone of transformation, Labradorite is a useful companion through change, imparting strength and perseverance.  It balances and protects the aura, raises consciousness and grounds spiritual energies.  Excellent for strengthening intuition-promoting psychic abilities.  Powerful in revealing the truth behind illusions, Labradorite banishes fears and insecurities, and strengthens faith in the self and trust in the universe.  It stimulates the imagination and calms an overactive mind, developing enthusiasm and new ideas.
Labradorite treats disorders of the eyes and brain, stimulates mental acuity, and relieves anxiety and stress.  It regulates metabolism, balances hormones and relieves menstrual tension.  Labradorite treats colds, gout, and rheumatism, lowers blood pressure, and aids in digestion.
According to an Eskimo legend, the Northern Lights were once imprisoned in the rocks along the coast of Labrador. It is told that a wandering Eskimo warrior found them and was able to free most of the lights with a mighty blow of his spear. Some of the lights were still trapped within the stone, and thus we have today the beautiful mineral known as labradorite.

http://www.beadfx.com/images/s34715.jpg





Thursday, November 29, 2012

Sparklies!

s34710 Gemstone Chain -  Faceted Nuggets - Carnelian / Gold (foot)s34709 Gemstone Chain -  Framed Drops - Chalcedony / Gold (foot)Oooo! Aaaaaahh! All the pretty sparklies! This week, we are featuring gem stone beads, on chains

I'm not sure that I need to say more - these pictures pretty much tell the story! 

We got a fabulous stash of stone beads, pre-strung on chains - all you have to do is add a clasp. 

Of course - nothing says you have to stop there! You could do multiple strands, or combine with other beads. Say one strand of gemstone chain and a few strands of plain chain? Or spice it up with some other beads? Anyway you slice it - the work is half done already! 

s34720 Gemstone Links -  Faceted Drops - Smokey Topaz / Silver (1)We have a random assortment of links too - so you could do your own gemstone chain! Just add an inch or two of your favourite chain between the links. 

Or - make a pair of earrings - that would be nice too. 








s34733 Stone Beads -  Faceted Rectangle - Gold Plated (1)We also have some new Metallic Stones! Sounds like a contradiction in terms, right? These are "plated" faceted stone beads - plated with copper, silver, or gold for a really luxe effect! How cool is that? 









And - if just straight gemstones is what you are hankering for - it being the season of "maybe I need a little something just for me" - 

We have some nice moonstone - for the dreamy look. 

s34744 Stone Beads - 6 mm Faceted Round - Moonstone (strand)
s34752 Stone Beads - 6 mm Faceted Chips - Labradorite (Top Grade) (strand)
And some top-grade Labradorite - really excellent stuff. 












s34763 Stone Beads -  Faceted Chips - Tourmaline Watermelon Mix (strand)
From Tourmaline chips to Peridot drops, a lovely selection of gemstones.

s34758 Stone Beads -  Faceted Flat Pear Drop - Peridot (1)











s34771 Book -  Simple Soldering - A BeginnerNow, if you are feeling like maybe you should tackle some of that Holiday Shopping - how about books? Great gift - easy to wrap, easy to mail. 


s34776 Book -  Diane Fitzgeralds Favorite Beading Projects - Edited by Nathalie MornuCourse - you could do this the other way around, you know. Buy the books for yourself and a nice strand of gems to make a thoughtful gift for a friend. 



New Website coming!

Exciting times coming for us and for you! Over the next few weeks - we are going to be changing up the website, making it easier to search, easier to shop, easier to do all sorts of things - like - see old orders, create a wish list, etc., etc. So stay tuned for exciting things to come! 


So, as always, wonderful, wonderful new things - all over the site. I leave you to explore at your leisure. Click on a link or an image to go straight to the item mentioned above, or go to our massive list of everything and look for the "new" tags. 


If that page seems overwhelming - which we freely admit it is! (Hence the need for a new website) - then try for bite-size portions by checking out these categories: Firepolish, Pressed Glass, Swarovski Crystal, Seedbeads, Stone and Pearls, Preciosa Crystal, Metal Beads, Other Cool Beads, Findings, Metal Clay & Supplies or Books, Kits, Tools
 
And don't forget to check out our free, yes, free projects. Over 300 to choose from - a new one every week!


Lampworking Studio is Now Open - Please call ahead to check availability and reserve a spot.
WE MOVED!
Don't forget - we are at our new location - so don't automatically drive to the old place by mistake - details on our About Us page.



Wednesday, November 28, 2012

HUGE CUBIC ZIRCONIA SALE!!!

CUBIC ZIRCONIA 
30% OFF

GET THEM WHILE YOU CAN!

WE ARE DISCONTINUING THEM AND WE WILL NOT BE RESTOCKING THEM.

http://www.beadfx.com/images/rts12753.jpg

What is a Cubic Zirconia? Many think "simulated diamond" when they think Cubic Zirconia (CZ). CZ's are used as simulated gemstones - and if you Google you'll get a variety of opinions as to how closely they mimic diamonds, largely based on just exactly what the site is trying to sell you - CZ's or diamonds. We think that these are lovely in their own right, much the same way the glass beads are. 
 
CZ is harder than glass, (at about 8.5 on the Mohs scale - nowhere near diamond, but much harder than most natural gems) and we tried the scratch test, and yes, they do scratch glass but are not scratched by it. It is dense - specific gravity between 5.6 - 6.0; refractive index is high at 2.15 - 2.18 (B-G interval) and its luster is subadamantine (Really! I have very little idea what that means - just nod and make knowedgeable noises). It's dispersion is very high at 0.058 - 0.066, exceeding that of diamond (0.044). 

(It's sparklier than diamonds). 

Cubic Zirconia has no cleavage and exhibits a conchoidal fracture (if it chips, you will see semicircular arcs - think of a big chip out of the bottom of one of those old thick-bottomed Coke bottles). It is considered brittle. (Don't smack it on things.)

Under shortwave UV cubic zirconia typically luminesces a yellow, greenish yellow or "beige." Under longwave UV the effect is greatly diminished, with sometimes a whitish glow being seen.
Naturally occurring CZ's are not commercially significant, and are manufactured in a laboratory as a gemstone. Really, really technical information is available here. (If the above wasn't technical enough for ya!) 


For CZ beads, click HERE
http://www.beadfx.com/images/rts12754.jpg

For double drilled CZ's, click HERE
 

For CZ Pendants and drops, click HERE
 

For other drilled CZ's, click HERE
http://www.beadfx.com/images/s17658.jpg

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Weekly Class Update






Open Beading Night
Do you have questions about a beading project? Are you looking for inspiration or creative input? Why not drop by an Open Beading Night at beadFX?!
Stephanie (and her sparkling personality!) will be in the classroom from about 6pm to 8pm most Thursdays to answer questions and give advice.
Calling in advance to reserve a seat is highly recommended.
Fees: Free!!!
About Stephanie : Stephanie Dixon is proud to be a CREATE YOUR STYLE with SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS Ambassador in Canada. She is a popular wire bead crochet and wirework designer/instructor in the Greater Toronto Area. Also known as The Dixon Chick, she is excited to be teaching in Tucson for Swarovski and on the 2011 CREATE YOUR STYLE cruise. For more info, please visit her blog,




Bring macramé into the 21st Century by creating an amazing bracelet using Regalize flat leather, 4mm metal beads and 26 gauge wire.

Technique Focus: Wire work
Skill Level: Beginner

InstructorPamela is a bead-stitcher at heart but has been branching into other techniques such as wire working. She has been creating jewellery for the past nine years and has instructed at BeadFX and through the Toronto Bead Society.





In this class you will learn the fundamentals of working with Art Clay Silver. We will mold, shape and texture this revolutionary material to create your own one of a kind, fine silver jewellery. During the class, you will have the opportunity to create earrings, charms, or a pendant. All materials included!

Instructor:
Creating beautiful art has been a love of Heather's since childhood.   Heather’s favorite medium has been molding, shaping and building with clay which led to her discovery of precious metal clay--and she has never looked back! She finds inspiration in forms, texture and nature.  She enjoys structural elements and creating movement in her pieces. Her practical personality pushes her to design and make pieces that can be worn in many ways, so that many of her  pieces are often reversible or have a dual purpose.

Heather loves the flexibility of Art Clay Silver and passionately shares her love of creating and building with this medium.  In her previous role as an occupational therapist, Heather loved teaching others ways of doing things differently and helping them achieve their goals. Now as an Art Clay instructor, she  uses these teaching skills to help her students create their pieces and to problem solve any design challenges. She  creates and teaches in Toronto where she lives with her enthusiastic boys and supportive husband.
Heather is a Senior Certified Art Clay Instructor.




Students will work with ICE RESIN® to create their own personal pieces of jewellery using either clipart or photographs or other inclusions (like gemstones, crystals, pieces of metal etc).
In the class, students will learn and design a collage to set in a bezel, and cover with ICE RESIN® to create a glass-like dome. We will look at different objects that can be converted into bezels and have fun.
NOTE: Your creations will have to stay at BEADFX overnight to set.
Skill Level: Beginner
Prerequisite: N/A
Technique Focus: Learning to use Resin

Ever since she was a small child, Rosemary (a.k.a. the Magpie), has been drawn to pretty, shiny objects. However, it wasn't until she started beading a couple of years ago that Rosemary realized she could make jewelry for herself. From beading, Rosemary moved on to making chainmaille jewelry and also likes to experiment with Art Clay Silver.


Be sure to check out the December class schedule for a full class listing. To register for any of our classes, please call 416.701.1373 or toll free 1.877.473.2323



Monday, November 26, 2012

Tip: too many beads

It's not often that you will hear me talk about "too many beads." But sadly - occasionally - it is true.

As in the necklace that I made for last week's InspirationFX

 In this particular case, I had strung all the beads first - just popping over to my bench every time I had to wait for the computer, and then made the pendant after.

In the instructions, I was careful to point out that you should only put two seedbeads in the centre, so that the pendant hangs balanced. However, that is NOT how I strung it, as I wasn't exactly sure what I was going to do with it at the time that I was stringing the beads.

So when I made the bail, I put the pendant on the necklace and finished wiring the bail - which solved any issue of getting the pendant to the centre of the beads. However, there were these three beads, and two on one side and one on the other.

And I just couldn't stand it!

And I thought to myself - "No one will notice. No one will care. "

But it just bugged me.

So - I could unstring half of it and restring it - ugh - or ... I could just eliminate one of those pesky beads.

I put the bead in question on my bench block, covered it with a paper towel to contain the mess, and whacked it with a hammer. It crunched into pieces, and problem solved. 


And that's how you get rid of the extra bead - break it up and out it comes. Seedbeaders do it all the time - breaking up the beads with a pair of pliers - but in this case - it required a little more force.

End result - no longer bugging me. 

Cheers!

Sunday, November 25, 2012

The Joy of Metal Clay

The Metal Clay Today contest "ornamental my dear" entries have been posted.  You can use this link to vote for your favorite design.

Last week I posted a link to a video for torch firing your metal clay by Art Jewelry Magazine.

I found a link to all their videos.  The have basics on the following:


  • Rolling metal clay
  • Texturing metal clay
  • Apply liver of sulphur patina
  • Using a tumbler to polish metal clay
  • Making paste
  • Making lavender paste
  • Repairing broke unfired metal clay


In other news I will be teaching an introductory class next Saturday!!!!

Saturday, November 24, 2012

The Business Chat - How to Not Sell Your Work


Black Friday, cyber Monday, Christmas, Hanukkah, ‘tis the season people. The customers are shopping! And we’re selling! Or trying to sell. Yet all around me, I see crafters who seem to be doing their best to not sell their work. Selling means customer service and being nice to people, that’s all there is to it. Some artists are starving for a reason, they sabotage themselves by bad behaviour. So here is a list of how not to sell your work.

Ignore the customer who walks into your booth.
One reason customers come to a craft show and not shop at the mall is to meet the artist. So meet them. Greet every single person who walks in.

Talk on the phone while a customer stands there.

Read a book, or check your email while a customer stands there.

Prop your iPad up on a stand and watch a movie on Netflix in your booth.

Invite your friends to come and hang out in your booth. Chat with them and ignore the customers.

Don’t put pricing on your products. Make them come to you.

Pull out a picnic lunch, something nice and messy. Add some garlic or curry maybe. Don’t check your teeth after eating because everyone loves a nice big wedge of spinach between your teeth.

Leave your booth to go and check out the cool stuff in the show.

Have your husband/boyfriend/partner drop by your booth and then make out. People just love interrupting some serious cuddling.

Whine to your neighbours about how stupid people are. Talk loudly about how people are so cheap and the show sucks.

Don’t tell the customers how you make what you do. Everyone understands your process don’t they?

Have a nap in your booth at a craft show.

Post comments on your facebook page about the stupid questions people ask you. Post more comments about how you hate the show.

Blog about your sick kids, your broken computer, the overprice bills for your supplies. Whine about how hard it is to sell. Whine more about your life.

Treat your blog like a therapists couch. Talk all about your feelings and why life just isn’t fair.

Apologize profusely for not blogging more. Then don’t blog again until you apologize again.

Each and every one of these I have seen. The napping one was great because she started snoring and drooling. There was a whole crowd of other vendors walking past and laughing at her. The napper? She couldn’t understand why she wasn’t selling anything.

I could go on and on. However I must go and make more jewelry to sell tomorrow. Me, I greet my customers and welcome them. And I sell. It’s not hard. Be nice to people, say hi, tell them about what you do. Smile. Sell your work. 

Thursday, November 22, 2012

Who Gives a Hoot ...

s34649 Metal Charm/Pendant -  Stunned Owl - Antiqued Silver (1)
s14899 Metal Component -  Scarab - Antiqued Copper (1)Who gives a hoot?



Don't let folks bug you. ;-)








s34662 Metal Component -  Griffin - Antiqued Silver (1)You don't need to give a flying ... eagle-headed, body and tail of a lion - wait - that's a GRIFFIN. Or a Griffon. Attach this to your entrance and it would be - wait for it - a Griffin-door.
Oh dear. 
s34644 Metal Charm/Pendant -  Bicycle - Antiqued Silver (1)



Some great new metal components this week - I swear the bicycle charm looks like someone is laying on their back with their feet in the air balancing another tire on their chest.


s34634 Metal Finding -  Lace Doily Ring - Antiqued Copper (1)I'm really looking forward to what I can do with this Lace Doily Ring. It's adjustable, so one size fits many. I don't believe in "one-size-fits-all" - but it will adjust to fit at least one finger on most humans. If you're shopping and you're on an alien planet - well - all I can say is ... shipping is going to take awhile. ;-)


s34635 Metal Component -  Stacked Flowers - Antiqued Brass (1)I'm eyeing this stacked flowers component and thinking about it with a nice flat bead in the center, and then the whole thing glued or wired onto the lacy doily ring. Just trying to thing of what the perfect bead to put in the middle would be.
tc94-2371-12 Metal Charm/Pendant - 25 mm Snowflake - Antiqued Silver (1)Anyway - check out the new brass and copper components on the Vintage-Look page


And the new metals charms on the Metal Charms page. Like this Snowflake Charm/Pendant - which - at this rate, might be the only snow we see for the season here.

tc94-6176-40 Finding - Toggle Clasp - 5 Hole Set - D rings and bar - Antiqued Silver (1)New in the Findings department - for multi-strand bracelets - Check out these D-Rings and toggle bars. Also available in a slotted D-Ring - great for small loomed or bead-weaving projects - anything strap-like.
tc94-6176-40 Finding - Toggle Clasp - 5 Hole Set - D rings and bar - Antiqued Silver (1) tc94-6176-61 Finding - Toggle Clasp - 5 Hole Set - D rings and bar - Bright Rhodium (1) tc94-6177-13 Finding - Toggle Clasp - Slotted Set - D rings and bar - Metal Noir (1) tc94-6177-18 Finding - Toggle Clasp - Slotted Set - D rings and bar - Antiqued Copper (1) tc94-6177-25 Finding - Toggle Clasp - Slotted Set - D rings and bar - Bright Gold (1) tc94-6177-40 Finding - Toggle Clasp - Slotted Set - D rings and bar - Antiqued Silver (1) tc94-6177-61 Finding - Toggle Clasp - Slotted Set - D rings and bar - Bright Rhodium (1)

So, as always, wonderful, wonderful new things - all over the site. I leave you to explore at your leisure. Click on a link or an image to go straight to the item mentioned above, or go to our massive list of everything and look for the "new" tags. 


If that page seems overwhelming - which we freely admit it is! - then try for bite-size portions by checking out these categories: Firepolish, Pressed Glass, Swarovski Crystal, Seedbeads, Stone and Pearls, Preciosa Crystal, Metal Beads, Other Cool Beads, Findings, Metal Clay & Supplies or Books, Kits, Tools.
And don't forget to check out our free, yes, free projects. Over 300 to choose from - a new one every week!


Lampworking Studio is Now Open - Please call ahead to check availability and reserve a spot.
WE MOVED!
Don't forget - we are at our new location - so don't automatically drive to the old place by mistake - details on our About Us page.




Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Jean Power's Geometric Beadwork

 Geometric Beadwork
 From Jean's website: www.jeanpower.com

This 128 page books is crammed full of geometric beadwork to delight and inspire.
Featuring 28 projects (with over 170 diagrams and over 220 photos) there is something for everyone.
The book begins with the basics of geometric beadwork showing all of the techniques, tips and information you need to get started. It then moves onto colour and design considerations before separating into 4 different chapters: Triangles, Squares, Pentagons and 'Beyond Corners'.
Even if you have purchased instructions from Jean before, seen her patterns in BeadWork, or done some other geometric beadwork there are still many projects and techniques which are brand new, never seen before.
In addition to full page photos, so you can see all the detail, every project has:
  • The quantity and size of beads you will need
  • The colours used
  • The techniques needed (every technique needed is shown in detail at the start of the book or relevant chapter)
  • Sizing information (where relevant)
  • Variation ideas (again where relevant)
  • Detailed step-by-step instruction using a mix of text, diagrams and photos
  • Jean's favourite feature: 'In a nutshell'. This is for anyone who is more advanced and doesn't need each project completely spelt out. For you I have distilled each project down to its essential steps meaning you can read that and dive right in




The contents pages show all 28 projects so you can easily find the one you want at a glance
 The contents pages show all 28 projects so you can easily find the one you want at a glance

The projects use a mix of text, diagrams and photos for the instructions
The projects use a mix of text, diagrams and photos for the instructions




I am having a great time buying Delica's and creating triangles. What you see below are some Christmas presents that I have started from patterns in this book.




I snapped up this book as soon as it was available for sale and am really enjoying the projects. It's also autographed!!!

You can find this book and many others at http://www.beadfx.com/catalogue/books.php
Start here to pick out your delicas. They are like potato chips - you can't just have one.















Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Weekly Class Update

Open Beading Night with Stephanie Dixon - Wednesday, November 21st from 6pm to 8pm


Open Beading Night
Do you have questions about a beading project? Are you looking for inspiration or creative input? Why not drop by an Open Beading Night at beadFX?!
Stephanie (and her sparkling personality!) will be in the classroom from about 6pm to 8pm most Thursdays to answer questions and give advice.
Calling in advance to reserve a seat is highly recommended.
Fees: Free!!!

About Stephanie : Stephanie Dixon is proud to be a CREATE YOUR STYLE with SWAROVSKI ELEMENTS Ambassador in Canada. She is a popular wire bead crochet and wirework designer/instructor in the Greater Toronto Area. Also known as The Dixon Chick, she is excited to be teaching in Tucson for Swarovski and on the 2011 CREATE YOUR STYLE cruise. For more info, please visit her blog,



African Helix Stitch Bangle - Pamela Kearns - Thursday, November 22nd from 6pm to 9pm



Bangles are all the rage this season and you can create your own using the African Helix stitch and even-count Peyote stitch. Lightweight and flexible, the bangles are created using size 11 seed beads.

Technique:Stitching
Level: Beginner



(Our final playday before the holidays!) 


Metal Clay Play Day
Note: This is not a class, and is intended only for those that already have some experience with metal clay.
Would you like to work on your metal clay projects in a fun, social and supportive environment? Join us during our periodic play days. We will provide access to basic tools and texture plates, but you are required to either bring or purchase your own Art Clay and supplies. You may also peruse our extensive library of videos and books during the day.  Kiln time will also be available for a nominal fee.
Play Day Fees: $15.00 (plus HST)
Metal Clay Firing Pricing:
$10.00 fee for firing and tumbling
  • Art Clay Silver 650 (both types)
  • Art Clay Original
  • Metal Adventures Fast Fire Bronze
$15.00 fee for firing, tumbling and pickling
  • Art Clay Copper
  • Hadar's Clay- pre-firing and firing (no tumbling)*firing test piece and firing
Currently the only firing sequence we are doing is the two step firing for the MID FIRING Schedule (which is for: Quick Fire Bronze or a Combination of Quick Fire Bronze, Copper and small amounts of Steel). Please refer to Hadar Jacobson's blog for detail or link to her updated firing schedule. Please do research when combining these clays and bringing them in for firing.

Be sure to check out the November class schedule for a full class listing. To register for any of our classes, please call 416.701.1373 or toll free 1.877.473.2323

Monday, November 19, 2012

More Bead Quilt-y Goodness

Not all contributions to the Bead and Button Bead-it-Forward Charity Bead Quilt are peyote (or gourd stitch) squares. This quilt - "Winging in from North Carolina" consists of squares by the Capital Area Beading Organization (CABO) in Raleigh, North Carolina. It was quilted by Stacy Werkeiser, associate Editor for Bead & Button magazine.

Some folks are combining beading with felting, sequins, applique, and other surface decoration techniques! Multiple submissions from some contributors show off their diverse talents!









This square by Sarah Shaw uses fiber to evoke an ocean for this little ducky to float on!




Evelyn Studer chose a metal casting, and embellished it and the felt square with seedbeads. 

 This very patriotic piece by Carolyn Duffield features an eagle charm over stitched rows of seed beads. 

 This piece by Rose Puri has a brass Chickie charm on a black background, festooned with seedbeads and star sequins.

 By Jane Harrison, this is a peyote stitched field azure, with a pewter birdie bead.
 Michelle Carr peyote stitched a peacock - which is so dazzling - it's hard to see the peacock for the beads!
 Emily White combined a base of stitched cubes with an owl button, and stars and a moon sequin.

JoAnn Barton peyoted a parrot!

 Evelyn Studer's Owl button is at home in the night sky!
 Rose Puri bird is a joyous riot of bubbly beads!
 Carolyn Duffield's birdy on a branch is spartan with a graphic approach.
 Suzanne Carpenter's flamingo is a study in contrast - a flamingo of the night.
 Kathy Carter "birds in a cherry tree" is charming - looking like an illustration for a child's book.
 Carol W. Sell "sells" me on this loomed cardinal.

 
 Helen Hobson gets playful with a duck-amongst-the-stars.
 Titania Delgado offers her take on the peyote peacock.
 Evelyn Studer created a bezel for this 3-d chickadee. This is the centerpiece for the quilt!


 Emily White - adorns a cast metal bird for a pretty in pink effect.
 Sarah Shaw's swallow charm zips across a felted sunset!
 Patricia Harter's flamingo almost glows - the contrast of the fuchsia and the seafoam beads screams "Miami Heat!"


 Lois Bressler fancies a flamingo in peyote stitch.
 Helen Hobson's bird bead sings to the stars!

 Michelle Carr created a dove of peace in bright, cheerful colours.
 Titania Delgado - a magnificent parrot in peyote!
 Rita Amos does her take on the owl button with beads!
 Emily White delightfully evokes Pingu - the penguin with an enamelled charm and a pile of ice cubes!

 Emily White's companion piece, owl button with stitched cubes and stars and moon sequins.
 Titania Delgado renders the pattern that I have come to think of as "crow with a ribbon worm."
 Sarah Shaw's ceramic bird bead found a home in a felted fibre nest.
 Reggi Powel's birdy and beads has an almost storybook feel to it.
 Carolyn Duffield weighs in with another patriotic red, white and blue and eagle combo. I particularly like the addition of a pink breast cancer ribbon in his beak.
 Titania Delgado demonstrates here that she does more than just stitch a mean peyote stitch.
 Helen Hobson evokes the tropics with a turquoise coloured parakeet button on a fuchsia background.


 Hope you enjoy all these inspiring samplers. Maybe you too would like to join the Bead it Forward project? More details here.